Response Updates

After Ida, Louisiana Residents Still Without Power but Not Hope

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September 23, 2021 | 2:30 p.m.

Hurricane Ida was a devastating hurricane,” said Margie Vives Trinidad of Ciudad Refugio Kenner in Louisiana.

Ciudad Refugio is one of many partners who has helped Convoy of Hope distribute nearly 3 million pounds of relief supplies across southern Louisiana. With their help, Convoy has served more than 150,000 people in need after Hurricane Ida made landfall three weeks ago.

Margie Vives Trinidad with Ciudad Refugio has been serving thousands of people affected by Hurricane Ida.

“There are Hispanic communities there that had not received any kind of aid until we went there with provisions from Convoy of Hope. They were so appreciative,” she said. “Some have water, some don’t. They were just so grateful to see help come.”

Convoy of Hope’s response to Hurricane Ida has reached more than 30 communities across the disaster zone. Affected areas are slowly regaining access to electricity and safe drinking water, yet many are still in need. Convoy’s ongoing relief efforts are strategically planned to deliver the most help to areas with the greatest need, from southern Louisiana to the Northeast.

Convoy is grateful for the partners — like Ciudad Refugio — donors, and hundreds of volunteers who have made this response possible. Together, we can provide hope in every storm.

To contribute to Convoy of Hope as our response to Hurricane Ida continues, click here.

September 17, 2021 | 11:45 a.m.

Convoy of Hope’s team and volunteers are working tirelessly to provide relief to millions struggling after Hurricane Ida.

Three weeks after Ida hit, there are still thousands without electricity. More than 25,000 electrical crews from 30 states are in Louisiana, working around the clock to get air conditioning running. The heat is sweltering.

“You can’t imagine the damage. You see it on TV, but until you see it in person, you don’t understand it,” said Gene Woolsey. Gene transported a tractor-trailer load of ice to Kenner, Louisiana — one of the cities hit hardest by Ida.

“A big part of the people coming through the line … they needed this to survive. Literally. I wouldn’t care if I [drove places] every day. If it’s for something like this — helping people — I would go,” he said. 

Gene is just one of Convoy of Hope’s volunteer truck drivers who selflessly serves those in need.

So far, more than 100,000 people have received food, water, cleaning supplies, and ice from Convoy of Hope. Convoy is also facilitating requests for resources from partners as donors continue to offer their support.

Because high temperatures and no air conditioning are major concerns, Convoy’s team continues to offer drive-thru distributions almost every day in Kenner.

For Gene, he says he’s also passing down a legacy of kindness in his own family as he serves people in need.

“My grandson, Owen, knows we are going to help others,” said Gene. “He told me, ‘Grandpa, tell them that I can go with you.’” And someday, he will be old enough to do just that. This is generosity in action, and it’s leaving a lasting legacy.

Thank you for continuing to support Convoy of Hope as we provide hope in every storm. To show your generosity for those in need after Hurricane Ida, click here.

September 14, 2021 | 4:18 p.m.

Convoy of Hope has been in Louisiana since Category 4 Hurricane Ida roared ashore on August 29. Early Tuesday morning, Hurricane Nicholas also made landfall on the Gulf Coast.

Strong winds wreaked havoc once again, leaving hundreds of thousands of families across Texas without electricity. Much of Louisiana is still without power from Ida — an estimated 185,000 homes.

Nicholas strengthened into a Category 1 hurricane before slamming ashore near Matagorda, Texas, with wind speeds hitting 95 mph. The biggest issue facing residents will likely be flooding. East Houston received more than nine inches of rain in less than 24 hours.

The storm is also drenching areas of Louisiana where the ground was already saturated. Early damage estimates are reported to be $70 to $80 billion from Ida alone.

Convoy of Hope was already prepared for a long-term response in the aftermath of Ida, given the impact along the Gulf Coast and in Northeastern states. With your help, Convoy of Hope has served more than 90,000 people who were affected by Ida.Convoy is committed to continuing aid efforts in communities along the Gulf Coast. To support your neighbors in need, click here.

September 10, 2021 | 10 a.m.

“I spent three hurricanes here already and this has been the worst,” said Hurricane Ida survivor Jorge Rodriguez. He managed to keep a smile as he described the strife Ida left behind.

Jorge regained access to running water after several days without, but his electricity remained absent. The lack of power left him vulnerable to the sweltering Louisiana heat. Then, additional concerns began to arise.

“We’ve got a little food in the house, but most of the food is gone already,” Jorge said. “It gets rotten if you have no power, so you have to throw it away.”

Through a Convoy of Hope distribution in his community, Jorge found help. He left with food, water and other necessities — but most of all, hope.

“It means a lot. Just a little bit helps,” he said.

Thanks to your support, Convoy has delivered more than 1 million pounds of relief supplies to hurricane survivors across 18 different communities in Louisiana.

To support Convoy of Hope as we respond to Hurricane Ida, click here.

September 9, 2021 | 9:15 a.m.

Ida’s official death toll in Louisiana rose to 26 after officials confirmed 11 more fatalities in the New Orleans area. Survivors in the area are slowly regaining access to in-home electricity and running water, and Convoy of Hope continues to provide help and hope in affected communities.

Amber has lived to tell about six hurricanes that wrecked her life and property — including Hurricanes Laura, Rita, Katrina, and now Ida. She first encountered Convoy of Hope two days after Ida hit. Today is day nine, and her power is still out. She hopes to get it back on soon.

“The kindness, it was so needed. We often feel judged for not evacuating, but it’s not as easy as it sounds,” she said. “To evacuate, you have to have a ton of money up front. That’s hard for a lot of people.”

For Amber, receiving groceries that don’t need to be refrigerated has been life-sustaining. She found out about Convoy of Hope’s distribution from her best friend, Melanie. They were both in desperate need of drinking water and nonperishable food. The two knew of other agencies offering help in their area, but didn’t have enough gas to visit them all.

“This distribution is different. It has everything right there!” Melanie said to Amber.

Amber rushed to the mall parking lot where Melanie had been and found Convoy’s tents. She received food, water, a solar-powered charger for her phone to reach her loved ones … and one other item that meant the world to her.

“Both our daughters got Rice Krispies Treats! You have no idea. It’s a big deal for your kid to get their favorite treat right now,” said Amber. “They love them, and there they were.”

It was a smaller item that made a huge impact. “I did not feel like I was a burden. That interaction made my whole day. In addition to having my physical needs met, Convoy of Hope was just so sweet and kind and loving,” Amber said.

Convoy of Hope’s generosity is made possible through your generosity. Thank you for giving so we can continue to reach people in need. Join us in providing relief by clicking here.

September 7, 2021 | 4:55 p.m.

“That storm was rough,” said Hurricane Ida survivor Herman Moreau. “Katrina was bad, but I think this one was worse in the wind. It did a lot more damage than Katrina did.”

Although many New Orleans residents now have power and running water again, many residents of rural communities outside of the city are still waiting.

“It’s going to be a rebuild, not a repair,” Phillip May, President and CEO of major power provider  Entergy Louisiana told the Associated Press.

Experts estimate that many in rural communities may be without power for the entirety of September. Others may have to wait even longer.

Herman is just glad that the hurricane is over. “I just hope there’s no more coming,” he said. “I was seeing trees flying, roofs flying, fences flying.”

Convoy of Hope gave Herman food, water, and other essentials to sustain him and give him hope while life slowly returns to normal.

“I think it’s very fantastic,” he said. “Thank you very much and God bless you.”

Thanks to your support, Convoy has delivered relief to tens of thousands of individuals across 15 different communities in Ida’s path. Although necessities like power and water are becoming more accessible in some areas, Convoy of Hope will remain in affected areas to help those still in need.

 To contribute to our response, click here.

September 5, 2021 | 5 p.m.

“Me and my cat were in a closet. We didn’t know what was happening, and the TV was saying the winds were so bad that it may blow the walls in,” said Hurricane Ida survivor, Alice Lemmon. 

Until the storm passed, there was little Alice could do but secure herself in her closet as the walls trembled. She tried to maintain hope as she listened to the troubling descriptors coming from her television in the next room. 

“The winds were unbelievable,” she said. “The howling inside of the house — I’ve never heard anything like that before. I could hear things hitting the house but I didn’t know what it was.” 

Alice solved the mystery the next morning: the hurricane tore apart her neighbor’s roof and launched it into her own house, piece by piece. Her house stood through the storm, but many in her neighborhood were not so fortunate. 

“I’m hoping to help them,” Alice said as she collected food, water, and relief supplies from Convoy of Hope’s point of distribution in her community. Many of those who live in her neighborhood are elderly; several are sick. She took it upon herself to personally deliver help to those who couldn’t leave what was left of their homes.

Alice left with groceries, relief supplies, and hope — both for herself and her neighbors. 

“It really does your heart good,” she said. “Thank you from the bottom of my heart.” 

Thanks to your support, tens of thousands of Hurricane Ida survivors are receiving help and hope as they rebuild and recover. To contribute to our response, click here.

September 4, 2021 | 5:15 p.m.

“I never would have thought that it would hit Houma like this,” said LaTonya Murphy. 

With prayer and quick thinking, LaTonya kept herself and her three children safe as they took shelter and waited for Hurricane Ida to pass. The stakes were especially high for LaTonya due to the fact that she is currently 12 weeks pregnant.

“It was very scary. We had to pile up in one room, in the closet,” LaTonya said. She remembered hearing the windows break and the rain pelt her home’s interior. “I was scared that something was going to happen to one of us.” 

When it was finally safe, LaTonya and her children began assessing the damage and counting their blessings. 

“Everybody lost their house in the area where I stay at. All the roofs are off. It’s just been horrible: no water, no lights,” she said. Although damaged, her house is one of the few still standing in her neighborhood. LaTonya and her children considered that a reason to be grateful. 

Soon, they set out looking for food and safe drinking water. When a police officer notified her of a nearby point of distribution Convoy of Hope was hosting, the Murphy family gratefully took what they needed. The distribution event provided food, water, sheltering supplies, and LuminAID solar lanterns to provide light and charge electronics while LaTonya and her children recovered from the storm. 

“It’s a disaster out here. Everybody is in need,” LaTonya said. “I’m really thankful and appreciative.” 

Thanks to your support, tens of thousands of people like LaTonya and her children have received help and hope following Hurricane Ida. And as of a few hours ago, one third of New Orleans residents have had their electricity restored.

Convoy will continue to provide relief for communities throughout Louisiana. To contribute to our response to this crisis, click here.

September 3, 2021 | 11:25 a.m.

“This is worse than Katrina, I think,” said Hurricane Ida survivor Reachel Mayeur. “You feel like it’s insurmountable, but it’s not.”

Reachel received food, water, and relief supplies at a local point of distribution hosted by Convoy of Hope. She made it a point to express how grateful she was for the help. 

“Because of you guys, I can get water, and ice, and a hot meal. Right now, that’s really good,” she said.

Thanks to your support, more than 30,000 survivors like Reachel have found relief through Convoy.

September 2, 2021 | 9:15 p.m.

Four days after Hurricane Ida made landfall in Louisiana, concerns over basic essentials like safe drinking water remain ever-present for many in the storm’s path. Convoy of Hope continues to provide relief supplies in hard-hit areas across southern Louisiana.

“Having to live through this heat, you’re miserable — totally miserable,” said Mike Montz, a Hurricane Ida survivor.

As Ida approached, Mike made the decision to stay in his home and ride the storm out rather than evacuate.

“I was sorry we stayed,” he said. “I wish we’d have left because it was really intense. I’ve never seen anything like this and I’ve been through a bunch of hurricanes.”

Mike was relatively unscathed when winds in excess of 100 mph blew a tree onto his house. To his surprise, shortly after the eye of the hurricane passed, Ida’s powerful winds then picked the tree back up and threw it elsewhere. When the storm died down, he found himself at the mercy of the dense Louisiana heat and immediately regretted his decision to stay.

“I would recommend anybody to get out. Get out — it’s not worth it,” Mike said.

Mike is one of hundreds of thousands of Louisiana residents who have spent the past several days looking for food, water, and relief supplies. He found help through a local Convoy of Hope distribution.

“I’m so glad that y’all are down here helping us out because it really is hard,” Mike said. 
Thanks to your support, people like Mike Montz can receive the help they need in the aftermath of Ida. To contribute to this response, click here.

September 1, 2021 | 7:18 p.m.

Four days after Hurricane Ida made landfall in Louisiana, concerns over basic essentials like safe drinking water remain ever-present for many in the storm’s path. Convoy of Hope continues to provide relief supplies in hard-hit areas across southern Louisiana.

“Having to live through this heat, you’re miserable — totally miserable,” said Mike Montz, a Hurricane Ida survivor.

As Ida approached, Mike made the decision to stay in his home and ride the storm out rather than evacuate.

“I was sorry we stayed,” he said. “I wish we’d have left because it was really intense. I’ve never seen anything like this and I’ve been through a bunch of hurricanes.”

Mike was relatively unscathed when winds in excess of 100 mph blew a tree onto his house. To his surprise, shortly after the eye of the hurricane passed, Ida’s powerful winds then picked the tree back up and threw it elsewhere. When the storm died down, he found himself at the mercy of the dense Louisiana heat and immediately regretted his decision to stay when Ida passed.

“I would recommend anybody to get out. Get out — it’s not worth it,” Mike said.

Mike is one of hundreds of thousands of Louisiana residents who have spent the past several days looking for food, water, and relief supplies. He found help through a local Convoy of Hope distribution.

“I’m so glad that y’all are down here helping us out because it really is hard,” Mike said. 

Thanks to your support, people like Mike Montz can receive the help they need in the aftermath of Ida. To contribute to this response, click here.

September 1, 2021 | 7:18 p.m.

Earlier today, Convoy of Hope served survivors of Hurricane Ida in LaPlace, Louisiana.

A resident of Kenner, a small community outside of LaPlace, relayed that he took shelter in his home as Ida passed. The hurricane’s straight-line winds — the likes of which he had never seen before — were strong enough to blow water through the keyhole of his front door. As the flood waters rose, he watched the storm uproot a tree and toss it into his neighbor’s pool.

The damage brought on by the hurricane left him to drive for hours just to obtain the essentials he needed. Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services team is able to ease such pressures by providing food, water, emergency supplies, and hope to people affected by this disaster.

Additional distributions in hard-hit areas like Houma and Des Allemands, Louisiana, will take place in the days to come.

With your help, we can provide hope in every storm. To contribute to our Hurricane Ida response, click here.

August 31, 2021 | 9:10 p.m.

Convoy of Hope’s points of distribution in Houma and Gonzales, Louisiana, served more than 1,000 families today. Community members received food, water, baby care kits, tarps, and other essentials to help sustain them as they begin the process of rebuilding what Hurricane Ida destroyed.

“People were terrified. People were saying that it was the scariest storm they have experienced,” said Stacy Lamb of Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services team. “But there is a sense of hope and optimism — knowing that it could have been much worse, and that things are going to be all right.”

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards shared a similar sentiment in a recent press conference: “I know that a lot of people out there are tired. Sometimes this can be too much to bear. It’s a lot to deal with. But I know the people of our state are stronger than the strongest of storms, our spirit is unbreakable, and we’re going to embark on this road to recovery together.”

Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services team is planning additional distribution events in hard-hit areas across southern Louisiana, such as LaPlace and Bayou Gauche.

Thank you for your continued support as Convoy provides relief to survivors of Hurricane Ida. To contribute to Convoy of Hope’s response, click here.

August 31, 2021 | 4 p.m.

As stories stream in about the devastation, Hurricane Ida brought to Louisiana and the surrounding areas, Convoy of Hope is on the ground, serving those in desperate need. But no matter where you are, you can still help those in need in this time of crisis. Here are a few ways you can make a difference and provide hope for Hurricane Ida survivors.

Donate. Unrestricted donations give Convoy of Hope the greatest amount of flexibility when responding to disasters and other needs around the world. Every unrestricted dollar given to our Feed the World Fund creates five times the impact! Unrestricted donations may be made here. Donations specifically for our Hurricane Ida response can be made online here, or by texting “IDA” to 68828.

Volunteer. Without volunteers, the work that Convoy of Hope does would not be possible. In times of crisis, kits full of hygiene supplies, baby care essentials, cleanup supplies, and other necessities, help survivors through some of the most difficult days of their lives. To volunteer to pack kits for distribution in disaster zones, click here.

Fundraise. Personal fundraisers are an effective way to raise money for a worthy cause with minimal effort. Tools like Give Lively and Facebook fundraisers allow users to set up peer-to-peer fundraising campaigns with just a few clicks. Those funds then help Convoy provide relief in times of need.

Advocate. Advocacy is the simple act of raising awareness and support. By sharing a social media post, telling friends and family about the needs Convoy of Hope is working to meet, staying up to date with Convoy’s response to Hurricane Ida, and directing others to convoy.org/ida, you can make a positive change in an otherwise devastating situation.

Thank you for your support as we help survivors of Hurricane Ida. Together, we can provide hope in every storm.

August 31, 2021 | 12:43 p.m.

“As we look around the affected communities, it’s easy to see how both water and wind damage have devastated the areas in Ida’s path,” said Stacy Lamb of Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services team. 

Convoy of Hope’s scout teams identified heavy damage from high winds in Houma, Louisiana, and similarly catastrophic damage from flooding in Laplace, Louisiana. The greater New Orleans area also sustained heavy damage.

“Right now, we have two distributions actively occurring, and another scheduled to take place tomorrow,” Stacy said. “We’re happy we can reach the people of Louisiana in their time of need.” 

“What I can tell you is that the last couple days have not been good for our state, and for the next several days and weeks, they will not be easy either,” Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards said during a press conference on Monday afternoon. “But I can assure you that we will get through this.”

Stacy and his team are currently distributing food, water, and relief supplies to survivors of Hurricane Ida in places like Gonzales and Houma, Louisiana. More than 400 families were served in Gonzales this morning. Water, Gatorade®, Clif Bars®, baby care kits, and tarps were among the many things distributed.

Convoy’s team members on the ground described multiple lanes of traffic backed up as community members eagerly awaited relief from Convoy of Hope’s points of distribution. Numerous loads of supplies continue to stream in from across the United States.

Scout teams continue to look for safe passage through areas where roads and infrastructure have sustained heavy damage, as Convoy identifies areas in greatest need where subsequent distributions will take place. 

Together, we can provide help and hope to survivors in this time of crisis. To contribute to our response, click here.

August 30, 2021 | 5:35 p.m.

“I think I’m still a little bit in shock from it all,” said Scott Bledsoe, Lead Pastor of Household of Faith in Gonzales, Louisiana. “It’s not the first time we’ve ridden out a storm, but it was definitely the worst.”

Scott and his wife noticed the winds outside their home becoming more violent as the storm drew closer. At approximately 7 p.m., they lost power. Then, a tree in their backyard fell into their house.

“People are just getting up today, assessing the damage, and starting the processing of cleaning up and trying to figure out what to do next,” Scott said.

The Bledsoe family is one of many left to sort through the damage Hurricane Ida left after making landfall on Sunday. Currently, more than 1 million individuals across Louisiana and Mississippi are without power.

Flooded streets and homes are shown in the Spring Meadow subdivision in LaPlace, Louisiana, after Hurricane Ida moved through Monday, August 30, 2021. Hard-hit LaPlace is squeezed between the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

“Those in the hardest-hit areas could experience power outages for weeks,” one of Louisiana’s primary utility companies said.

“Thousands of our people are without power and there is untold damage to property across the impacted parishes,” Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards added.

Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services team traveled South from Shreveport to Gonzales, Louisiana, and will continue into areas where the needs are greatest. Convoy’s scout teams are actively identifying the safest routes among areas with heavy damage to roads and infrastructure. 

Thank you for your support as we serve those impacted by this disaster. Together, we can provide hope in every storm. To contribute to our response to Hurricane Ida, click here

August 30, 2021 | 8:20 a.m.

Early this morning, Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services team began driving into the disaster zone created by Hurricane Ida. 

Ida lost momentum as it moved inland and is now a tropical storm. Nonetheless, while brandishing hurricane strength, Ida managed to knock out power for more than 1 million residents of Louisiana — including the entire city of New Orleans. It tore apart buildings, overtopped levees, and flooded communities across Louisiana’s coast.

Convoy of Hope’s fleet and responders drive toward the areas hardest hit by Hurricane Ida.

The 19-vehicle fleet Convoy of Hope deployed for this response will continue toward the disaster zone, bringing much-needed relief to the affected areas. Three additional tractor-trailers are en route to assist in the team’s response. 

Thank you for supporting Convoy as we provide help and hope to survivors of Hurricane Ida. To contribute to our response, click here.

August 29, 2021 | 10:30 p.m.

Hours after Hurricane Ida made landfall, affected communities are now beginning to see the extent of the damage in impacted areas.

Convoy of Hope’s team on the ground is reporting widespread power outages, powerful winds, and storm surge submerging homes and contaminating water supplies. In one community, violent winds ripped the roof off of a medical facility while patients scrambled for shelter inside. 

Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services team is safe and will continue to assess damage and proceed with their response in the days to come. Thank you for your continued support. 
To contribute to our response, click here.

August 29, 2021 | 6:30 p.m.

As Hurricane Ida tears inland from the Gulf of Mexico, affected communities are taking shelter as best they can and waiting for the storm to pass. The effects of the storm are already heartbreaking. 

Just north of the hurricane zone, Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services team is strategically positioned to move into the disaster zone to help people impacted by the hurricane as soon as it is safe to do so.

Early reports indicate that Ida has blown roofs off of buildings, reversed the flow of the Mississippi river, and brought storm surge of up to 16 feet in some areas.

“Hurricane Ida is one of the strongest storms to ever hit Louisiana,” the state’s governor, John Bel Edwards, said. Governor Edwards requested a Major Disaster Declaration from President Biden, due to the damage already caused as Hurricane Ida moves further inland. 

The National Hurricane Center forecasts Ida to maintain hurricane strength until late Sunday night, and predicts it to continue inland as a tropical storm. 
Convoy of Hope will continue to post updates here as the Disaster Services team responds in areas of greatest need. To contribute to our response, click here.

August 29, 2021 | 2:30 p.m.

Hurricane Ida made landfall this afternoon along the Louisiana coast as a Category 4 storm. Convoy of Hope’s fleet has already deployed 19 vehicles filled with life-sustaining food, water and relief supplies to Northern Louisiana and will begin helping the hardest hit areas as soon as it is safe to do so.

“Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services team prepared supplies and equipment to deploy ahead of the storm to help those affected as quickly as possible,” said Stacy Lamb, Senior Director of Convoy’s U.S. Disaster Services team.

Ida gained strength while traveling across the Gulf of Mexico from Cuba, growing into one of the strongest hurricanes to ever hit the state with 150 mph winds  — less than 10 mph shy of the criteria for a Category 5 hurricane. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) considers any hurricane with sustained wind speeds greater than 110 mph to be a “major hurricane.”

“Catastrophic wind damage is likely near the core of Ida as it moves inland over southeastern Louisiana through this afternoon,” the most recent statement from NHC read. The publication also warned of up to 24 inches of rain in some areas, as well as powerful storm surge, flash flooding, and the potential for tornadoes.

Hurricane Ida made landfall on the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which was one of the costliest storms in U.S. history.

In the days to come, Convoy will continue to offer relief to survivors of Hurricane Ida. To support Convoy in this response, click here.

August 29, 2021 | 9:46 a.m.

Hurricane Ida has grown into a massive Category 4 hurricane with current wind speeds of 150 mph. The storm is expected to make landfall this afternoon — the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which struck the same area of Louisiana.

At this time, Ida could easily become a Category 5 hurricane, should weather conditions continue to escalate.

Convoy of Hope’s fleet has already deployed to Northern Louisiana and will begin providing relief to the hardest hit areas as soon as it is safe to do so.

This is a developing situation. Check back in throughout the day for the latest updates.

Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services team is en route to Louisiana in advance of Hurricane Ida.

August 28, 2021 | 8:30 p.m.

Hurricane Ida has continued to gain strength as it barrels toward the Louisiana coastline. 

Convoy of Hope is pre-staging relief supplies in Northern Louisiana, allowing for the Disaster Services team to respond as quickly as possible after the storm makes landfall. Convoy has an additional warehouse in the state due to high-hurricane frequency in Louisiana, which will aid in the response.

“The hurricane appears to have begun its anticipated rapid intensification phase,” read a statement from the National Hurricane Center. Ida is expected to continue increasing in strength until it makes landfall as a Category 4 hurricane, the statement explained. 

The National Hurricane Center also warned of heavy rains, damaging winds, powerful storm surge, and the potential for life-threatening flooding.

Hurricane Ida is due to make landfall on August 29: the 16-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

As communities in Ida’s path prepare for the storm to arrive, Convoy of Hope is preparing to serve communities in need of relief as a result of the impending weather.

To contribute to our response to Hurricane Ida, click here.

August 27, 2021 | 11:40 a.m.

Convoy of Hope is pre-positioning relief supplies in response to Hurricane Ida. The storm is expected to make landfall in Louisiana on Sunday evening as a Category 3 or 4 hurricane. Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards has already declared a state of emergency.

“With Ida forecasted to be a major hurricane, Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services team is preparing supplies and equipment to deploy ahead of the storm to help those affected as quickly as possible,” said Convoy’s Stacy Lamb. 

Convoy will respond with food, water, and relief supplies — providing relief to those who will be affected by this storm. To contribute to our response, click here.

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Cities across the U.S. are welcoming refugees from #Afghanistan, trying to provide a safe place to stay. Convoy of Hope is coming alongside some of these cities to provide relief supplies. Learn more at http://convoy.org/afghanistan.